DIXIE: An American Classic
There are a wide variety of sights and sounds that one could immediately associate with the South or being Southern.

Nothing proclaims the heritage and honor of the South like the sight of our sacred banner floating on a warm southern breeze. It is a scene that makes the heart swell, the blood run faster and brings forth a cheer from deep inside us.

Likewise no sound can engender deep emotion, pride and strengthen our bonds like the strains of DIXIE. Whether its detractors like it or not, no other tune speaks to the honorable history of the South, and indeed is as ingrained in the American psyche as the distinctive tune of DIXIE.

File:Dan Emmett portrait.jpg
Ohio born Daniel D. Emmett published and first performed DIXIE in April of 1859. The song originated in the black face minstrel shows of the 1850's and quickly grew famous across the United States. Its lyrics were written in a comic, exaggerated version of English and tell the story of a freed black slave pining for the plantation of his birth.

Folk lore has told that Dixie was the Anthem of the Confederacy, which is 100% FALSE. The true Anthem of the Confederacy was "God Save the South".

It is a shame that with all the Lincoln worship going on today that few if any of the general public realize "Dixie" was also Abraham Lincoln's favorite song, and it was played at his inauguration.  Even though Lincoln loved the song Daniel Emmett was not well liked in the North for writing a song associated with the South. 

Since it writing, DIXIE has been played generation after generation at most any civic function. Every college band had it in its selection list. It was always played as a part of the program of Patriotic music both by the military and private organizations. What would a fireworks display be with out a rip-roaring rendition of "Dixie"?

School children were taught to sing it. It not only was the Song of the South but a cherished piece of American musical history.

All that began to change in the early 1990's when the scourge of political correctness started sweeping the land. In reality this is nothing more than censorship of ideas and beliefs. They have tried to tell us that the simple act of playing or singing of DIXIE is an act of racism. This of course is ridiculous, however that has not stopped their success in removing DIXIE from the national song book.
 
It is time to take a stand for DIXIE! If you do not know it, learn it. Teach it to your children, school groups, church groups etc. And make sure it is sung or performed.

"Dixie" is still considered to be one of the top two or three songs associated with the history of this country.





The ORIGINAL Version: Dixie’s Land (1859)
Lyrics by: Daniel Decatur Emmett

I wish I wasin the land of cotton,
Old times dar am notforgotten,
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.

In Dixie Land whar’I was born in,
Early on one frosty mornin’,
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.

CHORUS:

Den I wish I wasin Dixie, Hoo-ray! Hoo-ray!
In Dixie land, I’ll take my stand to live and die in Dixie;
Away, away, away down south in Dixie,
Away, away, away down south in Dixie.

Old Missus marry Will-de-weaber,
Willium was a gay deceaber; Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.

But when he put his arm around ‘er
Smiled asfierce as a forty-pounder,
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.

CHORUS:

Den I wish I wasin Dixie, Hoo-ray! Hoo-ray!
In Dixie land, I’ll take my stand to live and die in Dixie;
Away, away, away down south in Dixie,
Away, away, away down south in Dixie.

Hisface wassharp as a butcher’s cleaver,
But dat did notseem to greab ‘er;
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.

Old Missus acted the foolish part,
And died for a man dat broke her heart,
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.

CHORUS:

Den I wish I wasin Dixie, Hoo-ray! Hoo-ray!
In Dixie land, I’ll take my stand to live and die in Dixie;
Away, away, away down south in Dixie,
Away, away, away down south in Dixie.

Now here’s a health to the next old Missus,
And all the gals dat want to kiss us;
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.

But if you want to drive ‘way sorrow,
Come and hear dissong to-morrow,
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.

CHORUS:

Den I wish I wasin Dixie, Hoo-ray! Hoo-ray!
In Dixie land, I’ll take my stand to live and die in Dixie;
Away, away, away down south in Dixie,
Away, away, away down south in Dixie.

Dar’s buckwheat cakes an’ Injun batter,
Makes you fat or a little fatter;
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.

Den hoe it down and scratch your grabble,
To Dixie’sland I’m bound to trabble,
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.

CHORUS:

Den I wish I wasin Dixie, Hoo-ray! Hoo-ray!
In Dixie land, I’ll take my stand to live and die in Dixie;
Away, away, away down south in Dixie,
Away, away, away down south in Dixie
 The POPULAR Version

Oh, I wish I was in the land of cotton,
Old times there are not forgotten,
Look away, look away, look away Dixie Land.

In Dixie Land, where I was born in,
early on one frosty mornin', 
Look away, look away, look away Dixie Land.

I wish I was in Dixie, Hooray! Hooray! 
In Dixie Land I’ll take my stand
to live and die in Dixie. 
Away, away, away down south in Dixie. 
Away, away, away down south in Dixie







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